Tag Archives: Internet of Things

  • mobile application development

    The impact of Internet of Things (IoT) on mobile app development

    The Impact of IoTs on Mobile Application Development

    As mobile application development advances, it further integrates the Internet of Things (IoT). As the CIO, CTO or CEO of a startup, you’ll drive the development of your entire firm. In today’s business climate, that means offering a great mobile app. Integrating IoT can help you offer a next-level app that vaults your business forward.

    The Internet of Things

    Although only one percent of smart devices currently leverage IoT that number grows daily. You have probably used the IoTs and not realized it. A smart television, new refrigerators and the car service Uber all use the IoT. If you’ve flown on a plane recently, the plane probably used IoT.

    The IoT uses tiny sensors that attach to just about anything. Most plane part manufacturers not outfit parts with these sensors. The part transmits data in real-time as the plane runs, providing the airline with telemetry information and part health data. If a part begins performing poorly – outside of acceptable parameters – the sensors transmits it to the ground crew. IoT simply refers to the growing group of Internet capable devices.

    Mobile Apps Using IoT

    Sure there’s an app for that nowadays, but how helpful is it? Utilizing the IoT in app provides a new level of data and service.

    Before IoT, you could locate fixed position items like a taxi stand. With IoT, you can locate the closest car owned by the taxi or car service. That simple difference helped Uber to its quick success. Its app connects you with the nearest available vehicle. It lets you know its distance and your wait time for its arrival – all with the swipe of your finger.

    It’s not magic. Your cell phone has IoT sensors inside it. Your phone knows when you move, your location down to the latitude and longitude, when you activate each app, what music you listen to, the videos you watch, and the sound of your voice, of you use a voice-activated app like Siri. The Uber driver’s cell has the same sensors. Through the magic of the Uber app, you data joins, providing you with instant car service and drivers across the country with fares.

    Designing for Mobile with IoT

    The reward for designing an IoT enabled mobile app is consumer attention. In the US, the average consumer spends about five hours a day using a mobile device. You’ll need to know a few things before jumping into mobile app development using IoT. Mobile app development differs from traditional application development.
    While computer applications can balloon in size, consumers expect mobile apps to remain small, requiring only a few megabytes of space.
    Designing for mobile devices requires thinking small in screen size, too, but big when it comes to text and buttons.
    Security and privacy take priority. Integrating IoT with a mobile app requires data encryption and user identity protections.
    Design for the ability to leverage multiple mobile connectivity options, including Bluetooth, cellular, NFC and Wi-Fi.

    While you’re busy giving consumers a quick-loading app providing instant data, you’ll benefit, too. Mobile apps offer much more than utility.
    Apps increase customer engagement by making your business constantly accessible.
    An app functions as an advertisement parked on their phone. It reminds them of your business every time they glance at their screen.
    Apps decrease costs on both sides. They reduce the need for SMS messages and newsletters/direct mail campaigns. They also reduce phone contact needs.

    The Internet of Things can provide your business with an app that provides better sales and service, ala Uber. Integrating IoT into mobile application development requires extra work in the area of privacy and security, but its benefits to accessibility and customer engagement outweigh the effort.

  • What are the most important challenges for IoT adoption?

    What are the most important challenges for IoT adoption?

    The term IoT or the internet of things refers to devices that are connected to the internet. IoT does not cover typical internet connected devices such as a computer or mobile phone but, more of devices that you wouldn’t expect to be connected such as your toaster. Other examples could be your car, toothbrush, refrigerators, couch and even your tableware.

    Even though this seems like an amazing concept to push us towards the future, it still faces many difficult hurdles. Technology research firms have even predicted that there will be over 20 billion connected devices by the year 2020 and this will generate more than $10 trillion dollars within the technology sector over the coming decade.

    Privacy Concerns

    Data privacy still remains as a major problem when it comes to any connected device and this is due to the fact that connected devices can collect massive data on any user. This data can then be stolen through security holes found in the software of the device or directly from the databases stored at servers around the world.

    The world is still trying to keep up with current technologies, we do not even have the necessary privacy laws to keep some technologies from exploiting its users. The worst that could happen is that companies will rush their new products to the market without rigorous testing for security concerns. Even though software security seems to be focused on the most, hardware security also needs to be put in the spotlight.

    Insufficient infrastructure

    In order to have a more effective infrastructure for these new connected devices, companies will have to come together and build this new ecosystem that will help sustain all connected devices. Currently, a large proportion of smaller technology companies are at work building these infrastructures and have made tremendous progress such as the development of the newly founded internet of things end-to-end solutions.

    Unfortunately, more work needs to be done in this part of the industry. Mega corporations are still fighting each other over who will be crowned king of the IoT space. We also lack the proper gateways for newly connected devices to work properly. Gateways are the bridge that connects the device directly to the cloud or internet. There are still many questions as to how gateways will work, such as their power source, protocol, data filtering and most important is security.

    High Costs

    The structure to have an efficient gateway and the best security possible can get expensive very quickly. Most technology companies today would tell you that they’re designing their devices with a central cloud-based model and this method could lead high costs with no revenue. Giving all connected devices the ability to send out their data at any given time while securing it is difficult with our current infrastructure but also costly.

    With infrastructure out of the way, what would it cost to build actual cloud connected devices? Of course you will need to go through the steps needed as you would with creating any other device. These steps are, prototyping, learning and scaling. When it comes to connected devices, there are a couple more steps that are required such as hardware and software security testing, security upgrades and patches. If none of these steps are taken seriously by companies then, you can easily expect to be breached and lose millions of dollars in stolen information.

    Legality And Regulations

    Currently, there are no laws or regulations that are set in stone which will help regulate the many layers of technology that is needed for the internet of things to truly work. Unfortunately, devices that connect to the internet are raising many security concerns and currently there are no laws in place that address these problems. Passing new laws for these devices will definitely take a lot of time due to how complex devices will be and the infrastructure that will help run it.

  • The Internet of Things

    How the IoT is changing business today?

    The Future of Industrial IoT And Your Business

    As far back as the assembly line, we have used technology to gather data in order to increase output, become more efficient, and more effective. We are just now entering the age of the Internet of Things (IoT) and the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT).

    For companies in any sector that take advantage of the use of technology, now is the time to get ahead of the curve. Fortune 500 companies are ill equipped on their own to handle the sheer amount of data that sensors produce, but Centers of Excellence aim to solve this issue.

    Centers of Excellence

    To properly analyze and execute upon the data created by the billions of available sensors that exist today, companies are putting together brain trusts known as ‘Centers of Excellence’. These are think tanks filled with directors, software engineers, hardware engineers, and various other positions that are experts in IIoT across global business sectors.

    Big Data

    Sensors around the world are producing big data. Uses for this data includes increasing the efficiency of manufacturing, refining current and creating new products, and lowering labor costs.

    Everyone is in search of a faster, cheaper, and more reliable way of doing things. Data captured and made use of through sensors are a surefire way to contribute to this goal.

    For example, if a Caterpillar machine has sensors that can capture and relay data such as movement, fuel, and hydraulic usage, engineers can improve upon current machine designs. This will allow them to refine their designs in order to make the machines more efficient, more effective, and more attractive for the consumer. After all, who wouldn’t want a more reliable and less expensive version of products that are vital to daily operation?


    Labor costs are the first line item in the budget for nearly every business. Businesses need people to produce, operate, and maintain the products that they produce. For now, that is.

    Drones, robots, and driverless cars are already in use. While this may not be good news for the laborers, it is certainly good news for companies looking to cut costs and increase output. In fact, a driverless trucking company has already made a delivery of beer purely without the use of human labor. Imagine the ability to run your trucks 24 hours a day without the need for the human drivers to sleep. The ability for robots to run 24 hours a day forming, cutting, and welding sheets of metal to be used in various applications. Let us not forget drones that inevitably will fly commercial planes without the use of pilots.

    Data As A Product

    Big data is a name that doesn’t do it justice. With billions of IoT/IIoT devices and sensors now connected that each spit out a continuous stream of information, there is more information than people know what to with.

    In the future, when companies who are late to the party finally understand the need to join the connected devices and big data revolution, it will be another great opportunity for the early starters to cash in.

    The data that they collect today will be able to be sold to these late joiners in large packages for extremely high amounts of money. This is because they will have years of invaluable information collected and analyzed that late adopters will see as a necessity in order to survive, let alone thrive.

    Those companies that choose to jump the roadblocks and navigate their way with a compass early on will be able to sell their GPS-precise (so to speak) information at a premium.

    Final Thoughts

    The future of automation is close. Those companies that decide, and decide now, to get in on developing technologies on their own and through centers of excellence will cost them a lot of money now, but they will reap the rewards in the future. Their companies will understand what works and what doesn’t, thus being far ahead of the curve compared to late adopters. And when those late adopters finally arrive tomorrow, they will be met with a heavy price tag for guidance and data from those early adopters that took the risk today.

  • IoT application

    Why should CIO invest in IoT application development?

    Why should CIO invest in IoT application development

    In an ever-growing number of industries, the Chief Information Officer is becoming an indispensable part of the leadership team. As your organization’s CIO, it’s your responsibility to keep track of the constant technological changes confronting you and position your team to take full advantage of emergent opportunities. When it comes to the Internet of Things, IoT application development should be a vital part of your approach.

    The Scope Of Possibilities

    The Internet of Things has made a rapid transition from trade journal buzzword to core function for many companies. The IoT application is no longer about “pie in the sky” consumer goods like smart refrigerators; today countless companies are finding real applications for this technology that can drive sales, boost profits, and reduce costs.

    One of the most fertile fields for exploring Internet of Things opportunities is in the field of business-to-business and enterprise commerce. If your company provides smart products that other companies rely on, you need to be prepared to make full use of the data those products collect. There are two key challenges standing between your organization and the full realization of its IoT application potential: Coping with the scale of the data collected and building the tools to put that data to work.

    Problems Of Scale

    Your company doesn’t have to deploy many smart devices before you find yourself facing a tidal wave of incoming data. IBM recently estimated that a single smart car could generate as much as 25 GB of data per hour when in use. Even though your own devices are likely to be less “noisy,” the amount of data you need to sift through scales exponentially as more devices are deployed.

    App development is just part of making that data productive. You also need the IT infrastructure in place to receive, store, and manipulate your device data. The traffic between your organization and its devices may be two-way or one-way, and your infrastructure should be ready to handle the increased traffic that smart devices impose upon it. Successful implementation of smart devices will definitely put you into a “big data” situation, and you need to be ready to take full advantage of that.

    User Vs. Supplier Opportunities

    The sheer variety of different ways you might take advantage of smart devices and their data makes it difficult to talk generally about the sort of applications you’ll need. Just bear in mind that you likely have opportunities to benefit both your own organization and your end users. You may want to invest in separate teams to cover each of these bases.

    Strong applications for the user side of your smart device network will significantly improve your users’ experience and help you meet your customers’ needs. To this end, your user-side apps need to focus on ease of use and reliability. On the supplier side, you need to build robust tools that will allow you to streamline your other services. Look for every possible way to streamline your organization’s workflow through the data your devices collect. Making device data available to your support department can result in significant maintenance savings, for example.

    Why IoT Application Development Can’t Be Left Behind

    You’ve already gotten a glimpse of the advantages that you can capture by paying attention to the software side of smart devices. What about the potential pitfalls you face if you neglect your iot application? Justifying the resources you invest in apps requires you to present a compelling picture of the dangers you’re avoiding.

    While falling prices are a big driver behind the growth of the internet of things, building smart functionality into your products still represents a significant investment. Those costs will be wasted if your organization doesn’t have the software “muscle” to take advantage of the opportunities you’re building into your hardware. That means building and maintaining a potent iot application development team both to meet your current needs and to identify emerging ones.

    Smart devices are going to play a transformative role in a lot of different industries over the next few years. Is your organization ready to take full advantage of the possibilities they unlock? As the CIO, you have a responsibility to take the long view and line up the resources that will be crucial in getting the most out of your devices.

    Get Quotes for IoT Application Development

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    5 Things that will change your lives with internet of things (IOT)

    Even with self-driving cars making headlines, most consumers still seem unaware that the Internet of Things (IoT) is going to change their lives. Even the technically challenged will experience it every time they visit a friend or a public institution like the DMV. Your company may have little choice but to get onboard now. Just as social media, cloud computing, and the internet itself transformed business, smart devices that save time and money are driving innovation and opportunities. Here’s how this technology will impact your organization.

    1. Everything gets logged

    Smart devices feeding their information to computer applications can be used to track everything that goes on for every second they’re up and running. Busy hospitals or huge distribution warehouses will be automatically tracking equipment and even logging maintenance requests via smart chips and bar code scanner data shared over Wi-Fi. You’ll know where every piece of equipment is, what items are being used or produced, and what’s been shipped. You’ll know in almost real-time every product that’s been sold in every one of your hundreds of store locations, who sold it, and unless cash is used, who bought it. This can help your business improve operations and sales, quickly locate equipment and products even in transit, reduce shoplifting, generate up-to-date reports, and much more.

    2. More data

    With billions of smart devices already exchanging information over Wi-Fi, companies will be swamped with data from the Internet of Things. Sensors, keypads, and memory chips will be constantly collecting information on how smart refrigerators or programmable security cameras are being used. This can help your company improve products to meet real-use conditions, but it also means a flood of real-time information. Almost all data stores will become “big data” – very big. That requires new methods of consolidating and analyzing it so that it can be made available to marketers, strategists, sales, designers, engineers, customer support, and more. Companies making smart products will thrive only according to how well they use this mountain of data.

    3. Get there faster and safer

    They may not be the norm on the streets of the US yet, but in China a driverless bus successfully ran its route through crowded city streets. The technology works, and there’s no reason why it can’t work for you. Soon you’ll have driverless forklifts, maintenance vehicles, and delivery carts, all controlled by sensors, beacons, Wi-Fi, and computers to keep from running into each other, product, or human beings. They can run on schedule or on demand. And when the government does finally approve self-driving vehicles as street legal, your trucks will be running routes determined by computers for maximum economy of time and fuel. You can also consider drones as commercial vehicles. Long before Amazon started deliveries, they were used to upload footage for inspections and surveying, faster and more safely than any human could.

    4. Smart grids

    Almost anything can become a smart device. They can do more than gather data. A company in Idaho is now testing panels that it’s hoped will one day fill the streets. These are essentially big acrylic wafers that can support a truck, yet harboring LEDs and interconnected circuits so that they can monitor traffic, and work in sync to display warning messages or other alerts to drivers. They even have heating elements to melt ice and snow. It would cost billions to put them into place over the country’s highways, but how about a few strategically located in your office or manufacturing facility? They can alert and inform employees, guide visitors, or be outfitted with other technologies for taking pictures, recording sounds, temperatures, and weights, detecting intruders, and more.

    5. Remote management

    Today’s smart homes can be managed via smartphones. You can send a signal from across town to start the washer, turn on the lights, feed the dog, turn up the AC, and see who’s at the door. The same methods can be used for business. Just as it does for homeowners, mobile apps can let business leaders check on CCTV cameras, join meetings, view performance dashboards, create and share documents, initiate automated processes, track vehicles, time sheets, and payroll from almost anywhere in the world and at any time of day. This also helps to network with sales people or vendors when you’re away from the office. Remote management maximizes your involvement with a waste of time and travel.

    All it takes is some innovative programming with existing technology, and essentially any of your equipment, from coffee makers to tractor trailer trucks, can become a smart device. Gathering heaps of data can suggest improvements on everything your organization does. But the phrase “Internet of Things” is a bit of a misnomer; these devices are in place, ultimately, to communicate with you.

  • OTS Software Solutions for Internet of Things - IoT

    Internet Of Things (IOT) – New frontier in technology or a new threat?

    Is the Internet of Things (IOT) the greatest new technological frontier in a generation, or the next great threat? The answer, of course, is both. IOT has the potential to be both a godsend and a plague, depending on how we use it. On the positive side, IOT opens new doors to software development that allow a level of personal interconnectivity and convenience heretofore inconceivable. On the negative side, it opens new doors that hackers can use to launch newer and greater cyber attacks.

    IOT: The New Frontier

    The Internet of Things, simply put, is the integration of Internet-enabled computer technology into articles of clothing, automobiles, household items, personal accessories, and other everyday objects to perform a variety of everyday functions previously left to us human beings to handle.

    These IOT-enabled items are embedded with sensors that read data like temperature, time, humidity, light, sound, motion, pressure, weight, etc., and communication devices like RFID (radio-frequency identification), QR codes, or wireless technology to send this data for analysis and receive instructions for any necessary response. This allows for machines to take over doing many of the monotonous, repetitive tasks of daily living for us, so that we can get about to bigger and better things.

    The Internet of Things offers many exciting, practical benefits that almost seem to border on the realm of science fiction, such as:

    • monitoring your vitals directly from your clothing
    • tracking your children’s whereabouts directly from their book bag
    • keeping your refrigerator stocked with automatic calls to the store to reorder items you’ve run out of
    • starting the shower when your alarm goes off and warm the water to your ideal temperature
    • turning on the porch light and house heat remotely when you’re on your way home from work

    These are examples of the advantages of IOT to consumers, which in turn benefit businesses by making their products more relevant and appealing. However, there are still other, perhaps even more powerful, ways that the IOT can benefit businesses.

    All of those little computers connected to the Internet that are integrated into consumers’ everyday belongings can also be used to collect product and user data, and transmit it back to you, the business owner. In this way, businesses have access to unprecedented data about how exactly their products are being used.

    This in turn, of course, can then be used to update and improve those products in future iterations to fit even more seamlessly with the way consumers prefer to utilize them. In short, IOT may be the biggest boon to market research since Google Analytics.

    Thanks to IOT our civilization can look forward to the following imminent innovations, some of which we’re already beginning to see take shape:

    • automated homes
    • smart cities
    • smart environments
    • industrial automation
    • health monitoring

    IOT is truly a frontier in technology, as it provides vastly improved efficiency, saving both time and money, while improving the usefulness and durability of the machines we use to facilitate our lives. Therefore it improves our quality of life by allowing us more time, money, and energy for more creative and rewarding pursuits.

    It does, however, present one worrisome drawback.

    IOT: The New Big Threat

    The problem that many in the IT world see with an IOT-enabled world is that every computer connected to the Internet, no matter how small, can be hacked.

    Just like every personal computer has its own unique IP address, so too does every communication device embedded into IOT articles. Each IP address is a unique point of communication, like a doorway opening in two directions. This creates a point of access that hackers can exploit. In this way, IOT makes previously safe items and objects suddenly vulnerable to cyber security threats.

    A hacker could take control of the computer embedded into an IOT device and use it to communicate instructions to other, more powerful, machines nearby. This is how hackers cover their tracks: by routing their manipulations through a network of other people’s machines, making it nearly impossible to trace them back to their original source.

    When more and more systems of our cultural infrastructure are infused with (and dependent on) IOT, a plethora more information will become available to anyone who knows how to access it. This means big data on a city’s water and power usage, for example, could get into the wrong hands. And if law enforcement integrates IOT into their systems, then criminals have that many more inroads to create potential havoc.

    It also means personal privacy is at risk, as all the information our IOT-enabled belongings collect about us can potentially be accessed by the wrong people and used to cause us trouble. Not only could a hacker learn things about us that we don’t want them to know, they can even change data, with consequences ranging from inconvenient to life-threatening.

    Cyber security teams have been dealing with just this type of problem for as long as the Internet has existed. The difference now, with the advent of IOT, is a proliferation of mini and micro computers all over, making it easier and easier for hackers to slip through security nets.

    Fortunately as fast as software development teams are putting out new apps to make more everyday objects more convenient, they’re also working just as fast to keep up with the security risks these new technologies present. Nevertheless any businesses considering implementing IOT in their infrastructure or product offerings, needs to consider both security and privacy concerns moving forward.